Five Professional Audition Tips You Need to Know Now - Roger Love

Five Professional Audition Tips You Need to Know Now

By October 27, 2016Home, Singing

Making a name for yourself in the music industry requires that you are not only a talented singer but that you are also great at auditioning. Think about it, if you can’t impress a casting director, club owner or record company in two minutes, how can you ever get the singing gigs you need to showcase you in front of thousands of soon-to-be super fans?

I’ve been fortunate to help countless celebrities achieve their singing dreams during my thirty-plus years as a voice coach. Now, I want to help you, too! Enjoy these five veteran tips for auditioning, put them into practice, and post a comment or tweet me @RogerLove1 to tell me how your audition went!

I’m here to help you make your future as bright as you want it to be. So today I’m going to show you five tips that top performers know about auditioning so you can get your dream gig!

  • Determine what the audition host wants
  • Select your song length
  • Don’t arrive empty-handed
  • Know how to start and end
  • Practice good audition etiquette

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TRANSCRIPT

Hi, I’m Roger Love, celebrity voice coach and top-selling author. I’m working to make the world a better place, one singing voice at a time, starting with yours.

Making a name for yourself in the music industry requires that you are not only a talented singer but that you are also great at auditioning. Think about it, if you can’t impress a casting director, club owner or record company in two minutes, how can you ever get the singing gigs you need to showcase you in front of thousands of soon-to-be super fans?

I’m here to help you make your future as bright as you want it to be. So today I’m going to show you five tips that top performers know about auditioning so you can get your dream gig! These insights are based on over thirty-years of experience working with celebrities all over the world including from my studios in New York and Los Angeles.

First, determine what the audition host wants.

For example, are they requesting a Broadway, pop, or rock song? A great audition needs to fulfill the preliminary requests so if you find the information about the audition online or from a friend, be very careful to note what style of music they’re looking to hear and how long your song can last. If you have an amazing rock song but show up for a pop-style audition, you could have already squashed your chances of getting called back.

Second, select your song length.

Having the right length of song is incredibly important for auditions. Contrary to popular opinion, shorter songs are better! For example, some auditions only want 16 bars of the song or just a verse and a chorus. Carefully read the audition information to see if there’s a particular length of song that you have to meet or a maximum length that you can’t exceed. Then, time out your version of the song to make sure that you never go over the limit.

Third, don’t arrive empty-handed.

The most important thing to bring to an audition—besides a warmed-up voice and a bottle of water—is your accompaniment track, in your key, exactly where you want it to start and end, excluding any parts you don’t want to sing. Sheet music should be printed, taped and ready for the pianist. All CDs or MP3 playlists should have only your pre-edited song on them and CDs and sheet music should be clearly labeled with your name.

If you can, or if it’s requested, bring a nice headshot with your name and contact information typed (or very neatly hand-written) on it. This helps the audition host more easily match your name to your face when they sit down later to review their notes and determine who’s gonna get a callback or make the final cut.

Fourth, know how to start and end.

Your first and last impressions are very important in auditions. When you begin, sing standing mostly still. If you need to add some very small hand movements after about five seconds, that’s okay. But don’t break out into full-blown dancing at any point during your audition song.

After you finish your last note, wait for about three or five seconds and just stand still. It may feel awkward to you, but you don’t want to ruin your great audition by rushing off like you’re afraid of rejection. Make your big finish, smile and stand straight up with your arms at your side. Then look your listeners in the eyes, say “thank you” and exit the stage.

Fifth, practice good audition etiquette.

Most people know to always plan a little extra travel time before an audition in case they get lost or stuck in traffic. That way, they don’t have to arrive at the audition short of breath and apologizing for being late.

Besides just planning extra time and arriving early, successful singers know that auditions are a rapid-fire experience. Lots of amateur singers hear their name called and feel all this pressure to make fast friends with the audition host. The reality is, you’re not expected to hold a long conversation, chat up the staff, or chill with them before you sing. The hosts just want you in on time and out on time. Even if they love you, they still need to stay on schedule.

Good audition etiquette includes having all your paperwork and accompaniment music neatly in your hands when they call your name. At that point, walk in confidently. If the people on the review committee are in close proximity and move towards you, it’s okay to shake their hands and say “hello.” If they’re far away or they tell you to just stand and start, hand over your music, find your position and begin. Most greetings happen before you sing, so if you finish and they still haven’t reached out to you, it’s okay to just exit the stage, saying “thank you” and “goodbye” as you walk off.

By the way, don’t let the presence or absence of a handshake or chitchat become some superstitious indication of whether or not they like you or you’re gonna get the gig. Some casting directors are super warm and make everyone think they’re getting the lead part. Others are ice cold and then call you in a week and say you’re the greatest singer they’ve heard all year.

I’ve been fortunate to help countless celebrities achieve their singing dreams during my thirty-plus years as a voice coach. Now, I want to help you, too! Enjoy these five veteran tips for auditioning, put them into practice, and post a comment or tweet me @RogerLove1 to tell me how your audition went!

If this sounds like you, a great voice can be your solution. Start your effective, fun and impactful voice coaching right now!